Adding Greens to Your Pet's Diet

Curious Basenji dog puppy climbs on the table with fresh vegetables at home in the kitchen.

Romain calm! Adding greens to your pet’s diet can be easy and fun! With the help of our Veterinary Advisor, Jennifer Sperry DVM, we compiled a list of all the green fruits and vegetables that are safe for your pets to eat, why you should consider adding these greens to their diets and how to feed them to your pets!

If you’re introducing new food to your pet, make sure to feed them small amounts (this will also help the picky eaters get used to eating a greener diet) and supervise them while they eat. Although these fruits and vegetables are safe, not all stomachs are the same and every pet may have a different reaction.

Pet-friendly Greens

Spinach

  • Spinach is a super food containing loads of vitamins and minerals
  • It helps fend off inflammatory and cardiovascular issues, along with cancer
  • Spinach might be hard on your pet’s stomachs, so we recommend cutting it into smaller pieces, cooking it plainly and then adding it to their food

Green Apple

  • Apples are high in fiber and low in fat
  • They are loaded with vitamin C and antioxidants
  • They are a great addition for pets needing to shed a few pounds
  • Remove the core and seeds and then cut the apple into small cubes for your pet to eat

Pear

  • Pears are a great source of fiber, folic acid, niacin, phosphorus, potassium and copper
  • Cut the pear into small bite sizes for your pet and make sure to remove all the seeds

Asparagus

  • Asparagus is high in fiber, has lots of vitamins and is an excellent source of potassium and iron
  • Asparagus should be given in bite size pieces and should be softened through cooking to help digestion

Broccoli

  • Broccoli is high in fiber and vitamin C
  • Too much can sometimes cause a stomach irritation
  • The stems make good treats for dogs and some cats are tempted to chew off the florets

Celery

  • Celery is low in calories and has a high-water content
  • It is packed full of nutrients and antioxidants
  • Your pet can eat celery raw or cooked, but make sure to cut it into smaller pieces

Cucumber

  • Cucumbers are a low-calorie crunchy snack for the overweight pet
  • Having a high water content, they can provide pets with extra hydration
  • Peel the skin, remove the seeds and cut it into small pieces for your pet to enjoy

Green beans

  • Green beans are good for your pet due to their omega-3 fatty acids, vitamins and minerals
  • Enjoyed cooked or raw, your dog or cat can enjoy this superpower veggie as a snack or you can add it into their food dish

Green Peas

  • Green peas are an excellent source of essential vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber given as a snack or a compliment to your pet’s diet
  • Your pet can enjoy them frozen, thawed, steamed or mashed

Parsley

  • Parsley is loaded with vitamin A
  • It also helps your pet’s vision and immune health
  • The best way to feed your pet parsley is by adding a teaspoon to their water

Peppermint

  • Not eating more than 1-2 mint leaves a day, this herb can freshen your pet’s breath, aid digestion and reduce gas

Rosemary

  • This herb is high in iron, calcium and vitamin B6
  • Rosemary has also been shown to act as an antioxidant
  • You can add a teaspoon to your pet’s water as a treat.

Green Peppers

  • Green pepper is rich in vitamin E and C, which promotes healthy gums, skin and teeth
  • It also contains Vitamin E, which will help boost your pet’s immune system and fight off infections
  • Your pet can eat green peppers raw or cooked, just make sure to cut it into smaller pieces and remove the seeds

Kale

  • Kale is high in calcium, iron, potassium and iron which is good for your pet’s heart and bones
  • Try chopping or pureeing a small amount of kale to help your pet digest this leafy green


Start adding these green fruits and veggies today with this easy recipe and let us know how your pet likes their new and improved green diets on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter!

The information provided and contained herein are the opinions of PTZ Insurance Services Ltd. which are based on external publication. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional veterinary advice. PTZ Insurance Services Ltd. assumes no responsibility or liability for any loss, claims or damages arising out of the within content.